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Posts tagged: american empire

Horror stories about Muslim misogyny have long been used by western patriarchs to justify imperialism abroad and sexism at home. The Guardian’s Katharine Viner reminds us about Lord Cromer, the British consul general in Egypt from 1883. Cromer believed the Egyptians were morally and culturally inferior in their treatment of women and that they should be “persuaded or forced” to become “civilised” by disposing of the veil.

"And what did this forward-thinking, feminist-sounding veil-burner do when he got home to Britain?" asks Viner. "He founded and presided over the Men’s League for Opposing Women’s Suffrage, which tried, by any means possible, to stop women getting the vote. Colonial patriarchs like Cromer … wanted merely to replace eastern misogyny with western misogyny." More than a century later, the same logic is used to imply that misogyny only matters when it isn’t being done by white men.

telvi1:

odinsblog:

A Twitter Essay by @HeerJeet: Pathologizing Black-On-Black Crime

Related: An Essay By GradientLair: Respectability Politics 

Related: Not Here for your Internalized Racism

Related: Five Myths About Black-On-Black Crime

Related: How Crime is Viewed Through The Lens of Race in America

Related: What does “Black-On-Black” Crime in Ferguson even have to do with Mike Brown?

Black on Black time is a consequence of living in a system where striving is almost impossible; considering this imaginary “American Dream”

notemily:

tantefledermaus:

notemily:

everets:

micdotcom:

Your bottled water habit is sucking California dry

If you’re reading this, chances are very high that your home has at least one — and maybe more! — magic appliance that produces clean water suitable for drinking. That’s one reason to avoid paying for bottled water.

Another reason? There’s a good chance the water you’re buying at the supermarket was bottled in California, a state currently enduring a severe drought.

Turn on the tap instead Follow micdotcom

(Images via MotherJones)

"your bottled water habit" you mean bottled water companies

Word, stop blaming consumers for shit corporations do

Stop buying it.

If I stop buying bottled water and everyone who sees this post stops buying bottled water it’s not even going to register on the companies’ radar. We need to hold companies accountable for shit, not try to shame one person at a time into changing their habits.

if everyone stopped buying dasani tomorrow it’s not like they’s just tske it all back to cali and pour it back in the reservoirs

The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

Think about who’s in jail and why. 

(via amerikkkan-stories)

and that “crime” could be anything they felt like charging you with

(via boygeorgemichaelbluth)

This was how the myth of Black criminality started, for the record. After the abolition of slavery, a lot of states made laws targeting Black people specifically, and then put them on chain gangs to get free labor from them.

Oh, and the US is still disproportionately incarcerating Black people and private prisons are making huge amounts off them.

(via bunnybotbaby)

This is one of those pieces of information I wish had like 200 million notes on tumblr.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

meanwhile the dea teamed up with the cca

(via cxnfvsed-and-cxnflicted)

Yeah, I believe that black people are twice as likely to be arrested and convicted for committing the same crimes as a white person. Draw your own conclusions.

(via yesiamtheblack)

Reblogging this because everytime in real life I’ve said Slavery didn’t really end I’ve been dismissed as crazy.

(via locsgirl)

I’ll reblog this every time it comes up on my dash. People need to know!

(via andshegotthegirl)

All of this.

(via thisiseverydayracism)

Additionally, in Britain, three times as likely to be arrested.

Six times as likely for a drug offence.

(via moniquill)

When you do something again and again, placing great faith in it, investing enormous amounts of money in it, only to see indifferent or even negative results, you wouldn’t be entirely surprised if a neutral observer questioned your sanity or asked you if you were part of some cult. Yet few Americans question the sanity or cult-like behavior of American presidents as they continue to seek solutions to complex issues by bombing Iraq (as well as numerous other countries across the globe).

ttfkagb:

they wanna call black people thugs but the only ones pointing guns at people are the police.

kingjaffejoffer:

laughing at how CNN went into one of the looted businesses in Ferguson and spoke to the owner. the reporter started asking all these leading questions that were clearly setting up answers that expressed anger that their businesses were broken into. 

The owner was like “actually I just want justice for Mike Brown im not worried about material things”

eatcandydrinkcoffee:

bathsabbath:

oftaggrivated:

kavaeric:

je-suis-cocopuff:

micdotcom:

Your bottled water habit is sucking California dry

If you’re reading this, chances are very high that your home has at least one — and maybe more! — magic appliance that produces clean water suitable for drinking. That’s one reason to avoid paying for bottled water.

Another reason? There’s a good chance the water you’re buying at the supermarket was bottled in California, a state currently enduring a severe drought.

Turn on the tap instead Follow micdotcom

(Images via MotherJones)

EVERYONE PLEASE AT LEAST TAKE A QUICK SECOND TO LOOK AT THIS

BECAUSE IT IS EFFECTING THE EXACT AREA I LIVE IN

Lots of people believe bottled water is safer and cleaner than tap water, when in reality there’s no evidence proving such a thing.

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/stories/spacescience/water-bottle-pollution/

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/19/health/upwave-bottled-water/

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/study-bottled-water-safer-tap-water/story?id=87558

Penn & Teller’s Bullshit!: Bottled Water segment, gives a very good and thorough summary of the bottled water culture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHx6BX3HZJc

You want better water? Buy a Zero filter. SRSLY. Stop buying bottled if possible. You need water with you? Get reusable acrylic or glass water bottles (wrapped in a silicon sleeve) and fill it up from your filter pitcher. SAVE MONEY, SAVE MY STATE

This is all incredibly important, some cities have as little as 60 -120 days left.  Try using a refillable water container, and if you’re a California resident, make sure to report water waste in public spaces.

Also, maybe take a second and sign the petition to stop a giant Slip n’ slide from being built in Los Angeles. Priorities.

Boost
wintergrey:

James Baldwin on “looting” (via x).

wintergrey:

James Baldwin on “looting” (via x).

aflcio:

A hard day’s work shouldn’t be a death sentence.
http://aflcio.org/death-on-the-job

aflcio:

A hard day’s work shouldn’t be a death sentence.

http://aflcio.org/death-on-the-job

Anonymous
asks:
these anons are like, "can i be racist in the rain? can i be racist on a train? can i be racist in a box? can i be racist with a fox?"

thepoetspace:

incogneeco:

whiteoppression:

famphic:

anthotny:

postracialcomments:

lmfaoooooooooooooo Yes!

Lmao!
How can I be racist if I work with blacks
How can I be racist if one sold me slacks
I’m not racist I’m just like you. I’m best friends with a black or two.

i’m not racist, you see, it’s just a preference
i love eastern culture and its women’s deference
the west lost its way with no room for clemency
If I love Asian women, how’s that white supremacy?

i’m not a racist, i can’t be, you see
my great grandma’s grandma was part cherokee
plus one time i got called “cracker” to my face
don’t we all bleed red? i don’t even see race…

I’m not racist, blacks just need to stop complaining
Living in the past and white people blaming
I work hard, no handouts for every little fraction
If white privilege isn’t fair, then how is affirmative action?

This post is everything

white-wid0w:

America

Officers have tanks now. They have drones. They have automatic rifles, and planes, and helicopters, and they go through military-style boot camp training. It’s a constant complaint from what remains of this country’s civil liberties caucus. Just this last June, the ACLU issued a report on how police departments now possess arsenals in need of a use. Few paid attention, as usually happens.
 
The worst part of outfitting our police officers as soldiers has been psychological. Give a man access to drones, tanks, and body armor, and he’ll reasonably think that his job isn’t simply to maintain peace, but to eradicate danger. Instead of protecting and serving, police are searching and destroying.
 
If officers are soldiers, it follows that the neighborhoods they patrol are battlefields. And if they’re working battlefields, it follows that the population is the enemy. And because of correlations, rooted in historical injustice, between crime and income and income and race, the enemy population will consist largely of people of color, and especially of black men. Throughout the country, police officers are capturing, imprisoning, and killing black males at a ridiculous clip, waging a very literal war on people like Michael Brown.
Quinoa may deliver a complete protein—all of the amino acids you require—in a compact package, but rice and beans together actually do better. And like goji berries, blueberries and strawberries are packed with phytochemicals. The only problem is that lacking an exotic back story, food marketers can’t wring as exorbitant a markup from these staples: The domestic blueberry, for example, is periodically (and justifiably) marketed as a superfood, and in 2012, products featuring blueberries as a primary ingredient saw their sales nearly quadruple. But they only raked in $3.5 million—less than 2 percent of açaí-based product sales.

Tom Philpott, "Are Quinoa, Chia Seeds, and other ‘Superfoods’ a Scam?" (from Mother Jones)

Also worth highlighting is this section:

Worse than superfoods’ origin myths, though, are their effects on the people in their native regions. In 2009, at the height of the açaí berry hype, Bloomberg News reported that the fruit’s wholesale price had jumped 60-fold since the early 2000s, pricing the Amazonian villagers who rely on it out of the market. In the Andes, where quinoa has been cultivated since the time of the Incas, price spikes have turned a one-time staple into a luxury, and quinoa monocrops are crowding out the more sustainable traditional methods.” (emphasis mine)

So not only are the markets for “superfoods” putting the foods out of reach of the people who relied on them as a dietary staple, but there are foods easily accessible to us that deliver all the nutrition at a fraction of the cost, both to our grocery bill and to the social/environmental toll.

(via elenilote)