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Posts tagged: a still more glorious dawn

grimelords:

Making out with a person for the first time is the coolest thing and the second coolest thing is driving home and getting aware of all the parts of your face where they were and tasting their lip balm on your lips. The third coolest thing is outer space.

kaleigh-marie:

iluvatardis:

polyamorousmisanthrope:

valkyriestrikeofthelashatterdome:

gotterdammerungs:

                             (x)

And then in the future, everything changes. He’s been through it all, of course-watched humanity rediscover the heavens above them, watched them begin to wonder what’s out there. He cheered with the rest of the world when they landed on the moon, cheered as if he’d found Isla de la Muerta all over again, because there was something new. New treasure, a new horizon. But then they stop going, stop exploring, and he goes back to riding tankers across the rising seas. So he’s surprised when one day he wakes up from a night with his bottle of rum (his truest companion), and hears that there’s colonies on Mars now, and they need ships to supply them. He spends the next decade crafting new identities, learning all he can to qualify for the job, and after several tries (and even more faked deaths-this immortality thing isn’t all it’s cracked up to be in the age of the inerasable digital self) he gets it. The ships go nearly constantly now, the needs of the terraforming project creating an unbroken line of vessels from Mars to Earth and back again. “Show me that horizon,” he whispers to himself, his personal prayer of thanksgiving, each time they leave orbit, because the worlds, the stars are in motion and it’s never the same, with nearly three years for a round trip the ports are always different, even if they keep the old names. And finally one trip something goes wrong with the reactor, they’re too low on power and have to deploy the backups, and Jack (Lucky Jack, they call him, for he survives too many things he shouldn’t but science has yet to accept that maybe some things weren’t old wives’ tales after all) goes out for the spacewalk to bring up the solar panels. And as they rise, geometric patterns black against the sun’s glare, he’s struck by a powerful sense of déjà vu, because it’s all here-wind and sails, a ship beneath his feet and stars above his head, horizon in all directions. He wonders, for a moment, if the reason he’s still here is because the universe wanted a witness, to mourn the end of one age of exploration, and rejoice in the birth of the next.

Thank you for writing this. It made me cry, but oh I am so relieved to see the yearning for the stars.

That shouldn’t have given me as many feels as it did… 

This gave me chills like twice

presidentbear:


aggravatedtranscription:

monobeartheater:

micdotcom:

Astronauts just found life in space, we kid you not

Russian cosmonauts have discovered something remarkable clinging to the outside of the International Space Station: living organisms.
“Results of the experiment are absolutely unique" | Follow micdotcom


yooooOOOOOOY OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO HERE WE GO THERE IT IS HERE WE GOOOO IT ALL BEGINS HERE ITS HERE THIS IS IT THIS IS THE BEGINNING BRING ON MY MASS EFFECT FUTURE

OH YES

I feel I should clarify: they found sea plankton on the hull of the space station. it might not be alien life but it’s still incredibly exciting and inexplicable

presidentbear:

aggravatedtranscription:

monobeartheater:

micdotcom:

Astronauts just found life in space, we kid you not

Russian cosmonauts have discovered something remarkable clinging to the outside of the International Space Station: living organisms.

Results of the experiment are absolutely unique" | Follow micdotcom

yooooOOOOOOY OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO HERE WE GO THERE IT IS HERE WE GOOOO IT ALL BEGINS HERE ITS HERE THIS IS IT THIS IS THE BEGINNING BRING ON MY MASS EFFECT FUTURE

OH YES

I feel I should clarify: they found sea plankton on the hull of the space station. it might not be alien life but it’s still incredibly exciting and inexplicable

o’neill cylinder

o’neill cylinder

spacetravelco:

Physics prints by Justin VanGenderen

Available here & here.

livershit:

those rollercoaster goers got owned as fuck

NYOOM

livershit:

those rollercoaster goers got owned as fuck

NYOOM

sciencesoup:

What’s up with all those giant volcanoes on Mars?
Mount Everest is an enormous and awe-inspiring sight, towering 9 kilometres above the Earth’s surface. But if you were to stick it on Mars right next to Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the solar system, it would look foolishly small—Olympus Mons triples the height of Everest and spans the state of Arizona.
Mars is sprinkled with huge volcanoes, hundreds of kilometres in diameter and dozens of kilometres tall. The largest volcano on Earth, on the other hand, is Mauna Loa in Hawaii, which rises only 4 km above sea level.
So why is Mars blessed with these monsters of the solar system? Why doesn’t Earth have any massive lava-spewing structures?
Geology, my friends.
Earth’s crust is split up into plates that move and collide. Usually, volcanoes are formed at the boundaries where two plates meet, and one subducts below the other and melts in the heat below the surface. This melt rises as magma and causes volcanism.
But in some places on Earth, there are “hot spots” in the middle of plates, where magma rises up from the core-mantle mantle in plumes. When this magma is spewed up onto the surface, it cools and solidifies into rock, and over the years, the rock builds up and up. When plumes open out in the middle of the ocean, the magma builds islands.

Plumes are fixed, always pushing magma up to one spot, but the Earth’s plates don’t stop for anything. While the magma rises, the plates move over the hotspot—at a rate of only a few centimetres a year, but still, they move and take the newly-made volcanoes with them. So, gradually, the plates and volcanoes move on, while the plume remains in the same spot, building a whole new volcano on the next bit of the plate. As the plate moves on and on, the plume builds up a whole chain of islands, called island arcs. This is how the Hawaiian Islands were formed.

The island-volcanoes never get too big, because the plates keep moving onwards. On Mars, however, the volcanoes are enormous because the magma appears to keep rising, cooling and solidifying in the same place, taking its sweet time to build up colossal mounds of volcanic rock kilometres high.
So far, we’ve seen no volcanic arcs like we do on Earth, and this is generally taken as evidence that Mars has no tectonic plates.

sciencesoup:

What’s up with all those giant volcanoes on Mars?

Mount Everest is an enormous and awe-inspiring sight, towering 9 kilometres above the Earth’s surface. But if you were to stick it on Mars right next to Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the solar system, it would look foolishly small—Olympus Mons triples the height of Everest and spans the state of Arizona.

Mars is sprinkled with huge volcanoes, hundreds of kilometres in diameter and dozens of kilometres tall. The largest volcano on Earth, on the other hand, is Mauna Loa in Hawaii, which rises only 4 km above sea level.

So why is Mars blessed with these monsters of the solar system? Why doesn’t Earth have any massive lava-spewing structures?

Geology, my friends.

Earth’s crust is split up into plates that move and collide. Usually, volcanoes are formed at the boundaries where two plates meet, and one subducts below the other and melts in the heat below the surface. This melt rises as magma and causes volcanism.

But in some places on Earth, there are “hot spots” in the middle of plates, where magma rises up from the core-mantle mantle in plumes. When this magma is spewed up onto the surface, it cools and solidifies into rock, and over the years, the rock builds up and up. When plumes open out in the middle of the ocean, the magma builds islands.

image

Plumes are fixed, always pushing magma up to one spot, but the Earth’s plates don’t stop for anything. While the magma rises, the plates move over the hotspot—at a rate of only a few centimetres a year, but still, they move and take the newly-made volcanoes with them. So, gradually, the plates and volcanoes move on, while the plume remains in the same spot, building a whole new volcano on the next bit of the plate. As the plate moves on and on, the plume builds up a whole chain of islands, called island arcs. This is how the Hawaiian Islands were formed.

image

The island-volcanoes never get too big, because the plates keep moving onwards. On Mars, however, the volcanoes are enormous because the magma appears to keep rising, cooling and solidifying in the same place, taking its sweet time to build up colossal mounds of volcanic rock kilometres high.

So far, we’ve seen no volcanic arcs like we do on Earth, and this is generally taken as evidence that Mars has no tectonic plates.

scienceyoucanlove:




This incredible photo taken off the coast of Uruguay shows the contrast of bioluminescence created by tiny creatures called ‘sea sparkles’ and the glow of the Milky Way in one of the darkest skies in the world.
Read more: http://bit.ly/1uYZDHS via Earth Science Picture of the Day






from ScienceAlert

scienceyoucanlove:

This incredible photo taken off the coast of Uruguay shows the contrast of bioluminescence created by tiny creatures called ‘sea sparkles’ and the glow of the Milky Way in one of the darkest skies in the world.

propagandery:

Rabe Crater, Mars

Rabe Crater is a 108 km-wide impact crater with an intricately shaped dune field. The dune material likely comprises locally eroded sediments that have been shaped by prevailing winds. Other smaller craters in the region also contain these dark deposits. One relatively young and deep crater can be seen in the upper left; as well as the dark material, channels and grooves are clearly visible in its crater walls.

via European Space Agency

enochliew:

The Midnight Planétarium by Van Cleef & Arpels

The movement of each planet is true to its genuine length of orbit: it will take Saturn over 29 years to make a complete circuit of the dial, Jupiter will take almost 12 years, Mars 687 days, Earth 365 days, Venus 224 days and Mercury 88 days.

important aesthetic

important aesthetic






the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

So amazing

Holy

Def click da pic

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

So amazing

Holy

Def click da pic

warrenellis:

Rings Around the Ring Nebula      via NASA http://ift.tt/1sWZG2O

warrenellis:

Rings Around the Ring Nebula via NASA http://ift.tt/1sWZG2O