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Posts tagged: a still more glorious dawn

warrenellis:

Milky Way above Atacama Salt Lagoon   via NASA http://ift.tt/1Ddg7h6

warrenellis:

Milky Way above Atacama Salt Lagoon via NASA http://ift.tt/1Ddg7h6

the-social-recluse:

universe—cosmos:

Imagine how it would look if the Orion nebula is only four light years away - the distance the nearest star is to us, instead of 1,300 light years. It would be so bright that we wouldn’t be aware of the dark sky. We wouldn’t see other stars. The whole world would be the Orion nebula and the sun.

-The Universe 2x14: Nebulas


moebius

moebius

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

Laniakea: Our home supercluster

telegantmess:

treescab:

commission for fefetasprite! ^u^

qkazoo

telegantmess:

treescab:

commission for fefetasprite! ^u^

qkazoo

ultralaser:

bossymarmalade:

onedropmove:

JB3 with the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy pants on!
Those would definitely be in my weekly rotation, no doubt. I’ll trade you if they’re 32.

Oh sweet baby jesus such beauty

HI FORD

illustratographer:




I took a photo every 2 minutes over the span of about 2 hours at a 20 second exposure and animated it all together! This 2 second loop was the result! 
Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho

HOLY FUCK

holy fuck you can actually see how the earth turns by paying attention to the stars

this fucks me the fuck up

illustratographer:

I took a photo every 2 minutes over the span of about 2 hours at a 20 second exposure and animated it all together! This 2 second loop was the result! 

Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho

HOLY FUCK

holy fuck you can actually see how the earth turns by paying attention to the stars

this fucks me the fuck up

porpentine:

i’m into really low commitment hangouts like lying on the floor near each other or falling asleep together or falling into an endless void together

grimelords:

Making out with a person for the first time is the coolest thing and the second coolest thing is driving home and getting aware of all the parts of your face where they were and tasting their lip balm on your lips. The third coolest thing is outer space.

kaleigh-marie:

iluvatardis:

polyamorousmisanthrope:

valkyriestrikeofthelashatterdome:

gotterdammerungs:

                             (x)

And then in the future, everything changes. He’s been through it all, of course-watched humanity rediscover the heavens above them, watched them begin to wonder what’s out there. He cheered with the rest of the world when they landed on the moon, cheered as if he’d found Isla de la Muerta all over again, because there was something new. New treasure, a new horizon. But then they stop going, stop exploring, and he goes back to riding tankers across the rising seas. So he’s surprised when one day he wakes up from a night with his bottle of rum (his truest companion), and hears that there’s colonies on Mars now, and they need ships to supply them. He spends the next decade crafting new identities, learning all he can to qualify for the job, and after several tries (and even more faked deaths-this immortality thing isn’t all it’s cracked up to be in the age of the inerasable digital self) he gets it. The ships go nearly constantly now, the needs of the terraforming project creating an unbroken line of vessels from Mars to Earth and back again. “Show me that horizon,” he whispers to himself, his personal prayer of thanksgiving, each time they leave orbit, because the worlds, the stars are in motion and it’s never the same, with nearly three years for a round trip the ports are always different, even if they keep the old names. And finally one trip something goes wrong with the reactor, they’re too low on power and have to deploy the backups, and Jack (Lucky Jack, they call him, for he survives too many things he shouldn’t but science has yet to accept that maybe some things weren’t old wives’ tales after all) goes out for the spacewalk to bring up the solar panels. And as they rise, geometric patterns black against the sun’s glare, he’s struck by a powerful sense of déjà vu, because it’s all here-wind and sails, a ship beneath his feet and stars above his head, horizon in all directions. He wonders, for a moment, if the reason he’s still here is because the universe wanted a witness, to mourn the end of one age of exploration, and rejoice in the birth of the next.

Thank you for writing this. It made me cry, but oh I am so relieved to see the yearning for the stars.

That shouldn’t have given me as many feels as it did… 

This gave me chills like twice

presidentbear:


aggravatedtranscription:

monobeartheater:

micdotcom:

Astronauts just found life in space, we kid you not

Russian cosmonauts have discovered something remarkable clinging to the outside of the International Space Station: living organisms.
“Results of the experiment are absolutely unique" | Follow micdotcom


yooooOOOOOOY OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO HERE WE GO THERE IT IS HERE WE GOOOO IT ALL BEGINS HERE ITS HERE THIS IS IT THIS IS THE BEGINNING BRING ON MY MASS EFFECT FUTURE

OH YES

I feel I should clarify: they found sea plankton on the hull of the space station. it might not be alien life but it’s still incredibly exciting and inexplicable

presidentbear:

aggravatedtranscription:

monobeartheater:

micdotcom:

Astronauts just found life in space, we kid you not

Russian cosmonauts have discovered something remarkable clinging to the outside of the International Space Station: living organisms.

Results of the experiment are absolutely unique" | Follow micdotcom

yooooOOOOOOY OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO HERE WE GO THERE IT IS HERE WE GOOOO IT ALL BEGINS HERE ITS HERE THIS IS IT THIS IS THE BEGINNING BRING ON MY MASS EFFECT FUTURE

OH YES

I feel I should clarify: they found sea plankton on the hull of the space station. it might not be alien life but it’s still incredibly exciting and inexplicable

o’neill cylinder

o’neill cylinder

spacetravelco:

Physics prints by Justin VanGenderen

Available here & here.