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Posts tagged: 1968

70spostergirls:

Jane Fonda. Barbarella, 1968.

70spostergirls:

Jane Fonda. Barbarella, 1968.

In 1968, during the administration of US President Lyndon B. Johnson, Eartha Kitt encountered a substantial professional setback after she made anti-war statements during a White House luncheon. Kitt was invited to the White House luncheon and was asked by Lady Bird Johnson about the Vietnam War. She replied: “You send the best of this country off to be shot and maimed. No wonder the kids rebel and take pot.”

During a question and answer session, Kitt stated:

The children of America are not rebelling for no reason. They are not hippies for no reason at all. We don’t have what we have on Sunset Blvd. for no reason. They are rebelling against something. There are so many things burning the people of this country, particularly mothers. They feel they are going to raise sons — and I know what it’s like, and you have children of your own, Mrs. Johnson — we raise children and send them to war.

Her remarks reportedly caused Mrs. Johnson to burst into tears and led to a derailment in Kitt’s career

zuky:

bygoneamericana:

US athlete Bob Beamon (right), after breaking the Olympic record for the long jump, knelt and kissed the soil according to Islamic tradition to thank Allah for his exploit. At that moment a rain storm burst over the stadium, drenching the athletes. Mexico City, 1968.
By Raymond Depardon

Clearly Bob Beamon had the Creator on his side that day, because when he took off from the line on his first long jump attempt in the thin Mexico City air, a tailwind picked him up and sent him flying 29 feet 2 inches, breaking the previous world record by almost 2 feet — an unprecedented and still unduplicated shattering of a long jump record. When Beamon learned of the result (translated into feet and inches from the metric system used in Mexico), he collapsed with a cataleptic seizure, immediately after which a lightning storm descended, creating poor conditions for the rest of the Olympic competitors. After that day, Beamon never again jumped longer than 26 feet 11 inches for the rest of his career. His world record stood for 22 years, until it was broken in 1991 by Mike Powell whose record still stands.

zuky:

bygoneamericana:

US athlete Bob Beamon (right), after breaking the Olympic record for the long jump, knelt and kissed the soil according to Islamic tradition to thank Allah for his exploit. At that moment a rain storm burst over the stadium, drenching the athletes. Mexico City, 1968.

By Raymond Depardon

Clearly Bob Beamon had the Creator on his side that day, because when he took off from the line on his first long jump attempt in the thin Mexico City air, a tailwind picked him up and sent him flying 29 feet 2 inches, breaking the previous world record by almost 2 feet — an unprecedented and still unduplicated shattering of a long jump record. When Beamon learned of the result (translated into feet and inches from the metric system used in Mexico), he collapsed with a cataleptic seizure, immediately after which a lightning storm descended, creating poor conditions for the rest of the Olympic competitors. After that day, Beamon never again jumped longer than 26 feet 11 inches for the rest of his career. His world record stood for 22 years, until it was broken in 1991 by Mike Powell whose record still stands.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:


Kiyoshi Kuromiya was a Japanese-American who did a lot of amazing things.
From wikipedia:
To protest of the use of napalm in Vietnam in 1968, he announced that a dog would be burned alive in front of the University of Pennsylvania’s Van Pelt Library. Thousands turned up to protest, only to find a message from Kuromiya: “Congratulations on your anti-napalm protest. You saved the life of a dog. Now, how about saving the lives of tens of thousands of people in Vietnam.”

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Kiyoshi Kuromiya was a Japanese-American who did a lot of amazing things.

From wikipedia:

To protest of the use of napalm in Vietnam in 1968, he announced that a dog would be burned alive in front of the University of Pennsylvania’s Van Pelt Library. Thousands turned up to protest, only to find a message from Kuromiya: “Congratulations on your anti-napalm protest. You saved the life of a dog. Now, how about saving the lives of tens of thousands of people in Vietnam.”

There were 22,000 more Americans who died in Vietnam after Nixon sabotaged the peace talks in order to win an election. That’s 44,000 more American parents. That’s thousands and thousands more American children. That’s god alone knows how many more men, women, and children in Southeast Asia, all of whom died, very likely unnecessarily, because of Richard Nixon’s treasonous ambitions. Millions of people visit the Vietnam Memorial in Washington every year. Everyone of them who comes to commemorate a loved one lost in the war after 1968 should say a silent prayer at the wall and then turn slowly, and, with great dignity and quiet grace, spit in the direction of the White House, just because Richard Nixon once lived there.

Richard Nixon Tapes - History’s Yard Waste Explored, Continued - Esquire

On this weekend’s revelation that Nixon sabotaged peace talks in the fall of 1968:

It begins in the summer of 1968. Nixon feared a breakthrough at the Paris Peace talks designed to find a negotiated settlement to the Vietnam war, and he knew this would derail his campaign. He therefore set up a clandestine back-channel involving Anna Chennault, a senior campaign adviser.

At a July meeting in Nixon’s New York apartment, the South Vietnamese ambassador was told Chennault represented Nixon and spoke for the campaign. If any message needed to be passed to the South Vietnamese president, Nguyen Van Thieu, it would come via Chennault.

So on the eve of his planned announcement of a halt to the bombing, Johnson learned the South Vietnamese were pulling out. He was also told why. The FBI had bugged the ambassador’s phone and a transcripts of Anna Chennault’s calls were sent to the White House. In one conversation she tells the ambassador to “just hang on through election”. Johnson was told by Defence Secretary Clifford that the interference was illegal and threatened the chance for peace….

The president did let Humphrey know and gave him enough information to sink his opponent. But by then, a few days from the election, Humphrey had been told he had closed the gap with Nixon and would win the presidency. So Humphrey decided it would be too disruptive to the country to accuse the Republicans of treason, if the Democrats were going to win anyway. Nixon ended his campaign by suggesting the administration war policy was in shambles. They couldn’t even get the South Vietnamese to the negotiating table. He won by less than 1% of the popular vote. Once in office he escalated the war into Laos and Cambodia, with the loss of an additional 22,000 American lives, before finally settling for a peace agreement in 1973 that was within grasp in 1968.

(via dendroica)

When he became convinced it was being orchestrated by the Republican candidate, the president called Senator Everett Dirksen, the Republican leader in the Senate to get a message to Nixon.

The president knew what was going on, Nixon should back off and the subterfuge amounted to treason.

Publicly Nixon was suggesting he had no idea why the South Vietnamese withdrew from the talks. He even offered to travel to Saigon to get them back to the negotiating table.

Johnson felt it was the ultimate expression of political hypocrisy but in calls recorded with Clifford they express the fear that going public would require revealing the FBI were bugging the ambassador’s phone and the National Security Agency (NSA) was intercepting his communications with Saigon.

So they decided to say nothing.

The president did let Humphrey know and gave him enough information to sink his opponent. But by then, a few days from the election, Humphrey had been told he had closed the gap with Nixon and would win the presidency. So Humphrey decided it would be too disruptive to the country to accuse the Republicans of treason, if the Democrats were going to win anyway.

Nixon ended his campaign by suggesting the administration war policy was in shambles. They couldn’t even get the South Vietnamese to the negotiating table.

He won by less than 1% of the popular vote.

Once in office he escalated the war into Laos and Cambodia, with the loss of an additional 22,000 American lives, before finally settling for a peace agreement in 1973 that was within grasp in 1968.
theremina:

Anita Pallenberg in “Barbarella,” 1968

theremina:

Anita Pallenberg in “Barbarella,” 1968

themindislimitless:

whatgodzillasaidtogod:

talldarkbishoujo:

wretchedoftheearth:

I’ve never seen a GIF of this.

I was just reading about this during a wiki binge on Olympics incidents and did a little research on it. I never knew how deep the message was that Smith and Carlos were trying to send. Just about everything they wore and how they wore it had symbolism attached to it. (unzipped tracksuits for solidarity with blue collar workers, necklace of beads for lynching victims, etc) Calling it a “black power salute” is really reductive and it’s a shame (and predictable) that if it’s taught at all, that’s what it’s boiled down to.
Another thing I didn’t know: the Australian guy who came in second wore a patch for solidarity with them, he was protesting racist Australian immigration policies. When he passed away, Smith and Carlos were pallbearers at his funeral.

Don’t know what this is referring to? Here you go.

On a note: both athletes were expelled from the Olympics for this, but no objection had been made by the president of the games years before about a Nazi gesture in the Berlin Olympics. Racism times two.

themindislimitless:

whatgodzillasaidtogod:

talldarkbishoujo:

wretchedoftheearth:

I’ve never seen a GIF of this.

I was just reading about this during a wiki binge on Olympics incidents and did a little research on it. I never knew how deep the message was that Smith and Carlos were trying to send. Just about everything they wore and how they wore it had symbolism attached to it. (unzipped tracksuits for solidarity with blue collar workers, necklace of beads for lynching victims, etc) Calling it a “black power salute” is really reductive and it’s a shame (and predictable) that if it’s taught at all, that’s what it’s boiled down to.

Another thing I didn’t know: the Australian guy who came in second wore a patch for solidarity with them, he was protesting racist Australian immigration policies. When he passed away, Smith and Carlos were pallbearers at his funeral.

Don’t know what this is referring to? Here you go.

On a note: both athletes were expelled from the Olympics for this, but no objection had been made by the president of the games years before about a Nazi gesture in the Berlin Olympics. Racism times two.

fortuitouslogic:

norwegianfeminism:

Tommie Smith & John Carlos - Black Power.

It just needs to keep being reblogged.

simonfoxton:

PC Gumbs - London’s first black policeman . Sept. 1968 .

simonfoxton:

PC Gumbs - London’s first black policeman . Sept. 1968 .

itswalky:

rosalarian:

theswingingsixties:

Jane Fonda in ‘Barbarella’, 1968.

Need to sew this for myself.

My first thought was, “Oh, hey, Jenna Fischer….”  
“…oh.  OH.”

itswalky:

rosalarian:

theswingingsixties:

Jane Fonda in ‘Barbarella’, 1968.

Need to sew this for myself.

My first thought was, “Oh, hey, Jenna Fischer….”  

“…oh.  OH.”

50 Watts :: Cover Your Plexus

Plexus, issue 17, October 1968
Cover: Gilles Rimbault

50 Watts :: Cover Your Plexus

Plexus, issue 17, October 1968

Cover: Gilles Rimbault

littleraccoonhumps:

ridethekick:


DAVE: Open the pod bay doors, HAL. HAL: I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.

— 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968), Stanley Kubrick.

littleraccoonhumps:

ridethekick:

DAVE: Open the pod bay doors, HAL. 
HAL: I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.

— 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968), Stanley Kubrick.